What Is The Difference Between Mild, Moderate, And Severe Brain Injury?

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What Is The Difference Between Mild, Moderate, And Severe Brain Injury?2021-07-29T10:06:43+00:00

What Is The Difference Between Mild, Moderate, And Severe Brain Injury?

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What Is The Difference Between Mild, Moderate, And Severe Brain Injury?

Brain injuries often have lifelong health effects, ranging from memory issues to paralysis. The human brain controls the functions that keep you alive—breathing, eating, digesting food, and circulating blood. When a person suffers a traumatic brain injury, or “TBI” for short, it’s caused by sudden damage to the brain. This neurological damage can lead to permanent disability. If someone else’s negligence causes your brain injury, you can sue for compensation with the help of a personal injury lawyer in Los Angeles. Obtaining damage recovery will not cure your TBI, but it can go a long way towards aiding the healing process. There are three levels of brain injuries, and an explanation of each is featured below:

#1. Mild Brain Injury

The most common type of TBI is a mild brain injury. Many people do not realize they have sustained a mild traumatic brain injury until much later after their accident. These brain injuries result in temporary mental changes, such as confusion and memory loss or unconsciousness for less than 30 minutes. Mild brain injuries can also result in symptoms such as headaches, nausea, fatigue, dizziness, memory loss, irritability, and feelings of depression. These symptoms can last one year or longer.

People can sustain mild brain injuries in sports-related activities, slip and fall accidents, or car accidents. Concussions are the most common form of mild TBI, associated with symptoms such as confusion, mood changes, light and sound sensitivity, nausea, and loss of smell. These symptoms may not show up until days or even weeks after the injury and can be subtle, easily missed, or mistaken for a less serious condition.

#2. Moderate Brain Injury

A moderate brain injury is defined as “Injury resulting in unconsciousness for 20 minutes to six hours.” Medical professionals use The Glasgow Coma Scale, which is a neurological scale that gives a reliable way of assessing a person’s conscious state. The Glasgow Coma Scale gives scores between 3 and 15, where 3 is the worst prognosis and 15 is the best prognosis. Scores of 3 to 5 are potentially fatal. A moderate brain injury generally falls between a score of 9 to 12.

Symptoms of moderate brain injuries include cognitive damages, such as difficulty concentrating, memory loss, confusion, and difficulty processing language. Patients with moderate TBIs may also have problems speaking, reading, and writing, as well as experience loss of vision, hearing, smell, and taste. They may also experience seizures, sleep disorders, and chronic pain. Moderate TBIs can lead to permanent mental and physical disabilities.

#3. Severe Brain Injury

There are different levels of severe brain injuries depending on the severity of the accident. Severe TBIs have a range of cognitive, speech, sensory, physical, social, and emotional effects. A severe TBI can lead to a minimally responsive state, vegetative state, coma, or death. If a victim of a severe TBI is conscious after the accident, symptoms can include amnesia, slurred speech, paralysis, severe headache, blurred vision, and difficulty thinking.

Severe TBIs typically lead to permanent disability or death. Upon first sustaining a severe TBI, a patient may be unconscious but respond to outside influences, such as the pressure of a sharp object. However, this type of condition often worsens, and he or she slips into a coma or vegetative state.

If you sustain a blow to the head in any capacity, no matter the severity, it is important to first seek a medical professional to help in the case that you did sustain a TBI. Some traumatic brain injuries may not cause permanent damage, but the more severe varieties can have dire consequences. After the accident, the sooner that you get assistance, the better, especially if you have a moderate to severe level of TBI. It might help avoid or reduce the permanent effects of the injury.

Getting Legal Help For A Brain Injury

If you or a loved one needs legal help about an accident that resulted in a traumatic injury to the brain, contact a seasoned Los Angeles severe brain injury lawyer at Grey Law for expert advice. With over 25 years of experience handling personal injury cases, they know how to navigate any case to achieve a just settlement for you.

Brain injuries often have lifelong health effects, ranging from memory issues to paralysis. The human brain controls the functions that keep you alive—breathing, eating, digesting food, and circulating blood. When a person suffers a traumatic brain injury, or “TBI” for short, it’s caused by sudden damage to the brain. This neurological damage can lead to permanent disability. If someone else’s negligence causes your brain injury, you can sue for compensation with the help of a personal injury lawyer in Los Angeles. Obtaining damage recovery will not cure your TBI, but it can go a long way towards aiding the healing process. There are three levels of brain injuries, and an explanation of each is featured below:

#1. Mild Brain Injury

The most common type of TBI is a mild brain injury. Many people do not realize they have sustained a mild traumatic brain injury until much later after their accident. These brain injuries result in temporary mental changes, such as confusion and memory loss or unconsciousness for less than 30 minutes. Mild brain injuries can also result in symptoms such as headaches, nausea, fatigue, dizziness, memory loss, irritability, and feelings of depression. These symptoms can last one year or longer.

People can sustain mild brain injuries in sports-related activities, slip and fall accidents, or car accidents. Concussions are the most common form of mild TBI, associated with symptoms such as confusion, mood changes, light and sound sensitivity, nausea, and loss of smell. These symptoms may not show up until days or even weeks after the injury and can be subtle, easily missed, or mistaken for a less serious condition.

#2. Moderate Brain Injury

A moderate brain injury is defined as “Injury resulting in unconsciousness for 20 minutes to six hours.” Medical professionals use The Glasgow Coma Scale, which is a neurological scale that gives a reliable way of assessing a person’s conscious state. The Glasgow Coma Scale gives scores between 3 and 15, where 3 is the worst prognosis and 15 is the best prognosis. Scores of 3 to 5 are potentially fatal. A moderate brain injury generally falls between a score of 9 to 12.

Symptoms of moderate brain injuries include cognitive damages, such as difficulty concentrating, memory loss, confusion, and difficulty processing language. Patients with moderate TBIs may also have problems speaking, reading, and writing, as well as experience loss of vision, hearing, smell, and taste. They may also experience seizures, sleep disorders, and chronic pain. Moderate TBIs can lead to permanent mental and physical disabilities.

#3. Severe Brain Injury

There are different levels of severe brain injuries depending on the severity of the accident. Severe TBIs have a range of cognitive, speech, sensory, physical, social, and emotional effects. A severe TBI can lead to a minimally responsive state, vegetative state, coma, or death. If a victim of a severe TBI is conscious after the accident, symptoms can include amnesia, slurred speech, paralysis, severe headache, blurred vision, and difficulty thinking.

Severe TBIs typically lead to permanent disability or death. Upon first sustaining a severe TBI, a patient may be unconscious but respond to outside influences, such as the pressure of a sharp object. However, this type of condition often worsens, and he or she slips into a coma or vegetative state.

If you sustain a blow to the head in any capacity, no matter the severity, it is important to first seek a medical professional to help in the case that you did sustain a TBI. Some traumatic brain injuries may not cause permanent damage, but the more severe varieties can have dire consequences. After the accident, the sooner that you get assistance, the better, especially if you have a moderate to severe level of TBI. It might help avoid or reduce the permanent effects of the injury.

Getting Legal Help For A Brain Injury

If you or a loved one needs legal help about an accident that resulted in a traumatic injury to the brain, contact a seasoned Los Angeles severe brain injury lawyer at Grey Law for expert advice. With over 25 years of experience handling personal injury cases, they know how to navigate any case to achieve a just settlement for you.

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